Font Size: a A A

Singer’s Guide To Karol Szymanowski’s Opera King Roger, Op. 46

Posted on:2006-10-26Degree:DoctorType:Dissertation
Country:CanadaCandidate:Krzysztof Klemens BiernackiFull Text:PDF
GTID:1105931358665753Subject:Music
Abstract/Summary:Request the full-text of this thesis
This dissertation examines Karol Szymanowski's opera King Roger Op. 46, with the aim of showing its position as one of the most original stage dramas of the 20th century, and as one of the most important operatic compositions ever produced by Poland. It is meant to provide the reader with historical and biographical background, a musical and dramatic analysis of the score, as well as a translation and conversion of the libretto into International Phonetic Alphabet. It is designed as a single volume guide intended for anyone interested in a deeper dramatic, philosophical, or linguistic understanding of King Roger, or for anyone engaged in preparation of this work for performance. The opening Chapter provides an overview of available literary sources and present scholarship regarding Karol Szymanowski and King Roger. Chapter 2 presents a brief biographical profile of the composer, gives the historical background regarding circumstances of King Roger’s composition, and examines the collaboration between Karol Szymanowski and the opera’s librettist Jarosław Iwaszkiewicz. Chapter 3 focuses on musical analysis, and Chapter 4 provides critical interpretations of King Roger’s philosophical meanings with special emphasis on its possible interpretation as a dream. The study closes with a conclusion concerning the place and value of this opera in the context of 20th century operatic literature, as well as brief assessment of the present situation regarding performances of King Roger. Besides the bibliography and a complete discography, an Appendix provides the libretto of the opera with a word-for-word translation from Polish to English and transliteration into International Phonetic Alphabet.
Keywords/Search Tags:Stage Dramas, King Roger
Request the full-text of this thesis
Related items